Mycena Metropolis: 2 – Mycena viscidocruenta – A Red Toadstool

South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_1
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_2
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_3
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_4
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_5
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_6
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_7
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Mycenaceae-Cruentomycena-Mycena-viscidocruenta_8
Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet

Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Mycenaceae
Mount George Conservation Park (Deanery Hill area), South Australia – June 4th, 2014 – wet conditions growing on a litter of twigs on ground

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

The colour of this species is pure red, the gills are a little paler, and the stem a little darker. In the younger specimens, the cap is a small globe shape, but it flattens and the sides turn up leaving the centre of the cap depressed – This species rots wood and these tend to grow on the ground on twigs etcetera – It is found in forests and more open heathland and in gloomy midwinter, they can be a thrilling jolt of colour. They are found across Australia and New Zealand. Below are some links to other Mycena articles on SAN-WP as well as some external pages:

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/08/mycena-metropolis-1/

http://fungimap.org.au/index.php/fduonline-home/123/294/agarics/P-mycena-viscidocruenta
http://www-public.jcu.edu.au/discovernature/fungi/fungi/JCUDEV_017265
http://eol.org/pages/6676287/overview

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2 thoughts on “Mycena Metropolis: 2 – Mycena viscidocruenta – A Red Toadstool”

  1. Great photo-essay, Michal. And what a stunningly beautiful colour! I’m surprised I haven’t encountered this Mycena species myself, given the umpteen fungi treks I’ve made over the years…I wonder how common these are?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. On the walk along the river from Bridgewater, but well before you go through the tunnel to enter the Deanery Hill section of the Mount George Conservation Park, on the side of the path nearest the hill is where you will find quite a few of these in the wetter, cooler months – My brother Adam and I went back a few weeks later and they were all gone – Despite their bright colour, they can be difficult to spot at times, because they flourish far from where you expect to see Mycena, ie, they appear to be growing out of the ground in places where you expect to see Leratiomyces ceres and other common ground-dwellers – They are actually doing a typical Mycena wood-rotting thing, but just on smaller twigs and things – Good hunting! – All The Best – M

      Like

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