Tag Archives: Agaricales

The Snowy Waxcap – Hygrocybe virginea (?)

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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
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Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others

Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus etcetera, etcetera
Possibly an introduced species (?)
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Hygrophoraceae
Wittunga Botanic Garden, South Australia – June 29th, 2014 – around the rise on the dam in the grass in cool, damp conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

This species must have a world record in name changes: Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus, Hygrophorus virgineus, Camarophyllus virgineus, Cuphophyllus virgineus, Agaricus niveus, Hygrophorus niveus, Camarophyllus virginea, Hygrocybe nivea, Cuphophyllus niveus (Really and truly people! – get a Grip!) – An Agaric (gilled mushroom) The species has a largely north temperate distribution, occurring in grassland in Europe and in woodland in North America and northern Asia, but is also known from Australia. It typically produces basidiocarps (fruit bodies) in the autumn.
also been recorded from Australia. Waxcap species grow in old, unimproved, short-sward grassland (pastures and lawns) in Europe, but in woodland elsewhere. Recent research suggests waxcaps are neither mycorrhizal nor saprotrophic but may be associated with mosses. They are good indicators of soil health, because in some areas where there has been farming with chemicals, the Waxcaps won’t return until 50 years after such processes have ceased.
I found the white very tricky to process – Also, Adam and I do what we call undercranking (Darkening the shot in the camera using the A/V Setting so as not to blow the highs) – It really helps in conjunction with selecting a light spot on the subject and half-holding down the click button (Adjust the composition while holding down the half-click to get the framing you want.
Similar species: Humidicutis maevis.
Thanks to Ben Loveday for scouting this bunch for us!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygrocybe_virginea

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Amanita muscaria – The Fly Agaric: 1

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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric (an uncharacteristic juvenile form)
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric (juvenile form)
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric (transitioning from juvenile to adult red form)
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric (past its prime)
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Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric (uprooted mushroom showing stipe and gills)

Amanita muscaria aka Fly Agaric or Fly Amanita
introduced pest species
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Amanitaceae
Stirling – June, 2011 – roadside verge of mixed vegetation near Aptos Cruz Gallery

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

This distinctive, common fungus is an introduced species and is considered a pest. It is the epitome of the fantasy toadstool and is often seen in illustration and so forth. It is poisonous, although when carefully prepared, some people in other countries use them in food dishes. All the specimens here were growing on a roadside verge in close proximity to each other and no other Amanita species were present. The earliest form is a little uncharacteristic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_muscaria

Pretty Grisette aka Vermillion Amanita – A Red Toadstool

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Amanita xanthocephala aka Pretty Grisette, Vermillion Amanita
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Amanita xanthocephala aka Pretty Grisette, Vermillion Amanita
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Amanita xanthocephala aka Pretty Grisette, Vermillion Amanita (Juvenile form)
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Amanita xanthocephala aka Pretty Grisette, Vermillion Amanita (Juvenile form)

Amanita xanthocephala aka Pretty Grisette, Vermillion Amanita, Vermillion Grisette, Amanitopsis pulchella
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum/Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Amanitaceae
Wottons Scrub, Kenneth Stirling Conservation Park, South Australia – June 14th, 2014 – soggy, wet, cool conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Although poisonous, and closely related to the introduced species Amanita muscaria, this pretty, indigenous fungus emerges from the floor of Eucalypt forests like a sphere of yellow gelati while still covered in the juvenile down so characteristic of the family – This species has an ectomycorrhizal relationship with Eucalyptus. It occurs in south-west Western Australia, and in the forests of South Australia and around up into southern Queensland.

There is some radial grooving on the cap and that and its tendency to smaller size helps distinguish it from the introduced species Amanita muscaria  . It is quite common and may occur singly or in groups, although I have only seen it singly.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amanita_xanthocephala
http://fungimap.org.au/index.php/fduonline-home/22/294/agarics/P-amanita-xanthocephala

The Ghost Fungus That Glows In The Dark!

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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus
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Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus

Omphalotus nidiformis aka Ghost Fungus, Pleurotus nidiformis, Pleurotus lampas
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Marasmiaceae
Mount George Conservation Park (Deanery Hill area), South Australia – June 4th, 2014 – wet conditions growing at the base of a tree

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz

This ghostly white mushroom has a top tinted with other colours – It was originally categorized as a Pleurotus, an edible group, but its chemistry makes it poisonous/inedible – It is a large and spectacular fungus by South Australian standards – Its stem is usually hidden behind other tops in their crowded bunch, feeding on dead or dying wood, usually at the base of trees – It is from Southern Australia and Tasmania, and has recently been sighted in India – Here is a Link to a night shot showing its bioluminescence – It’s not really intense to the naked eye, so I assume this is a pretty long exposure:

http://ichykoo.com/2012/03/28/omphalotus-nidiformis-a-mushroom-that-glows-in-the-dark-does-it-also-have-health-benefits/
http://fungimap.org.au/index.php/fduonline-home/130/294/agarics/P-omphalotus-nidiformis
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Omphalotus+nidiformis
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omphalotus_nidiformis

Mycena Metropolis: 2 – Mycena viscidocruenta – A Red Toadstool

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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
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Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet

Mycena viscidocruenta aka Cruentomycena viscidocruenta, Ruby Bonnet
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Mycenaceae
Mount George Conservation Park (Deanery Hill area), South Australia – June 4th, 2014 – wet conditions growing on a litter of twigs on ground

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

The colour of this species is pure red, the gills are a little paler, and the stem a little darker. In the younger specimens, the cap is a small globe shape, but it flattens and the sides turn up leaving the centre of the cap depressed – This species rots wood and these tend to grow on the ground on twigs etcetera – It is found in forests and more open heathland and in gloomy midwinter, they can be a thrilling jolt of colour. They are found across Australia and New Zealand. Below are some links to other Mycena articles on SAN-WP as well as some external pages:

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/08/mycena-metropolis-1/

http://fungimap.org.au/index.php/fduonline-home/123/294/agarics/P-mycena-viscidocruenta
http://www-public.jcu.edu.au/discovernature/fungi/fungi/JCUDEV_017265
http://eol.org/pages/6676287/overview

Mycena Metropolis: 1 – Mycena subgalericulata

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Mycena subgalericulata (?)
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Mycena subgalericulata (?) (underview seen in mirror)
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Mycena subgalericulata (?)

Mycena subgalericulata (?)
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Mycenaceae
Lobethal Bushland Park, South Australia – July 13th, 2014 – wet conditions on tree trunk

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

This Mycena species is part of a suspected complex of species – Mycena release enzymes that help to break down cellulose and other compounds. These colonies can be very extensive. Here below are some links to my other Mycena articles and some external pages:

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/mycena-metropolis-2/

http://qldfungi.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Mycena-subgalericulata.pdf

Xerula australis – A Mushroom Chameleon

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Xerula australis aka Oudemansiella radicata var. australis, Rooting Shank (?)
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Physalacriaceae
Morialta Conservation Park, South Australia, North East Sector – Central Track near Moores Road Entrance – 2014-07-26 – very wet, cool conditions with heavy showers

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz

Growing in what appears to be muck and rotting wood – Surrounded by smaller mushrooms and sheltered by heavily rotted wood – 10cm high – cap was about 2.5 cm wide. This appears to be an extremely variable species – The blue edge was very striking and apparently not always present in other specimens