Tag Archives: Ardeidae

White-faced Heron

South-Australia-Natureteers-Bird-Pelecaniformes-Ardeidae-Heron-Egretta-novaehollandiae_1
Egretta novaehollandiae aka White-faced Heron

Egretta novaehollandiae aka White-faced Heron
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Pelecaniformes
Family: Ardeidae
Findon, South Australia – April 20th, 2014

Photo: Aldo Trissi

This text is quoted from the excellent bird book “Fleurieu Birds” by Peter Gower:
“Size: 66-70cm. A common water bird seen on most wet areas. Becomes relaxed to human activities around towns and farms.`Feeds on crustaceans, small fish, frogs, tadpoles etc. Nests from September to November. Three to five eggs are laid in a shallow stick nest normally higher than 5 metres.”

I will add that the male breeding plumage, like most Egrets, is very elegant and consists of longer decorative feathers – There is a view of this on this Wikipedia Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-faced_heron

Peter Gower’s book is my go-to book for bird sightings – It is such an easy view and so fast to peruse – It is available from the South Australian Museum Shop, or you can see Peter’s work in the following Link:

http://gowerphotos.tripod.com/

Advertisements

The Eastern Great Egret

MurrayMouth-2013-01-15-GreaterEgret_AD_1 MurrayMouth-2013-01-15-GreaterEgret_AD_2 MurrayMouth-2013-01-15-GreaterEgret_AD_3 MurrayMouth-2013-01-15-GreaterEgret_AD_4

Ardea alba ssp modesta (?) aka Ardea modesta, Ardea alba, Eastern Great Egret, White Heron
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Pelecaniformes
Family: Ardeidae
Murray Mouth, South Australia – January 15th, 2013 – sunny conditions

The Great Egret can be seen worldwide on most continents – It is a large, white Heron, and some debate exists as to whether it is perhaps actually several separate species in different areas – The beautiful, white bird is very graceful in flight – My brother Adam took these photos and he has always been fascinated by them since his first interest in bird subjects in Japanese and Chinese watercolour painting as a youth. He says “They are almost as large as humans when you get close, the wingspan must be about 8 feet, around 2.2metres (at least that was my impression when one flew up out a creek bed as I approached the creek one day in the Grampians with Graeme Hastwell)” – A useful identification feature is the commissural line, a crease that runs from where the upper and lower beaks meet and extends backwards under the eye and continues a small distance behind the eye – Wikipedia says the bird can be seen “wading or standing still in shallow water and spearing prey with its bill”.

The smaller bird in the fourth picture is possibly Egretta garzetta aka Little Egret.