Tag Archives: Bushland Park

Mycena Metropolis: 1 – Mycena subgalericulata

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Mycena subgalericulata (?)
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Mycena subgalericulata (?) (underview seen in mirror)
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Mycena subgalericulata (?)

Mycena subgalericulata (?)
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Mycenaceae
Lobethal Bushland Park, South Australia – July 13th, 2014 – wet conditions on tree trunk

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

This Mycena species is part of a suspected complex of species – Mycena release enzymes that help to break down cellulose and other compounds. These colonies can be very extensive. Here below are some links to my other Mycena articles and some external pages:

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/mycena-metropolis-2/

http://qldfungi.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Mycena-subgalericulata.pdf

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The Parrot’s Beak Orchid

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Pterostylis nutans aka Nodding Greenhood or the Parrot’s Beak Orchid
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Angiosperm
Class: Monocot
Order: Asparagales
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Orchidoideae
Tribe: Diurideae
Lobethal Bushland Park, South Australia – July 13th, 2014 – soggy conditions amongst rock ferns on sclerophyll forest floor

When I first saw this species, I had no idea what it was – It was one of the strangest plants I had seen – It is larger than its little cousin, Pterostylis (Linguella) nana, and it is quite hunched over or nodding – The flower is translucent and it has a strangeness that can really fascinate a photographer.