Tag Archives: Coleoptera

Brown Darkling Beetle

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Ecnolagria grandis aka Brown Darkling Beetle (?)

Ecnolagria grandis aka Brown Darkling Beetle (?)
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Suborder: Polyphaga
Superfamily: Tenebrionoidea
Family: Tenebrionidae
Subfamily: Lagriinae
Tribe: Lagriini
Subtribe: Lagriina
Mylor Conservation Park, South Australia – January 4th, 2014 – warm, sunny conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Amber-coloured Beetles that feed on dead plant and fungal matter and live in a variety of habitats including forests, heaths and urban areas including gardens. The adults can fly but rarely move even when disturbed and then fly slowly. Their two eyes wrap around the base of each antennae. The larva are dark brown and hairy, with a pair of hooks on the rear end and they live in the ground and come out in numbers to feed at the surface by night on vegetable litter including fallen Eucalypt leaves which they leave skeletonized.

http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Ecnolagria+grandis
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_beetles/BrownDarkling.htm
http://www.zin.ru/animalia/coleoptera/eng/elaec428.htm

Long-nosed Weevil – A Very Endearing Leaf-muncher!

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Rhinotia hemistictus aka Long-nosed Weevil
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Rhinotia hemistictus aka Long-nosed Weevil
South-Australia-Natureteers-Coleoptera-Weevil-Rhinotia-hemistictus_3
Rhinotia hemistictus aka Long-nosed Weevil
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Rhinotia hemistictus aka Long-nosed Weevil

Rhinotia hemistictus aka Long-nosed Weevil
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Superfamily: Curculionoidea
Family: Belidae
Montacute Conservation Park – November 15th, 2014 – mild to warm, overcast conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

These were found on what I believe were Acacia pycnantha trees, at least 200 yards apart on different tracks, and I think they were feeding, although in my excitement, I didn’t take much notice – All I could think was “Get the shot!”: – I had wanted to photograph a species like this for years – macro photography has finally given me the opportunity to explore the realm of the mini-marvels that reside all around us. I haven’t been able to find out much about this species yet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhinotia_hemistictus

http://anic.ento.csiro.au/insectfamilies/biota_details.aspx?OrderID=25407&BiotaID=44456&PageID=families