Tag Archives: Michal Dutkiewicz

Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_1
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_2
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_3
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_4
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_5
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_6
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_7
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_8
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Asteranae
Order: Ericales
Family: Ericaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – mild, overcast conditions

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz

Advertisements

Harlequin Mistletoe – Lysiana exocarpi – A Pretty And Tasty Mimic

South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_1
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_2
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_3
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_4
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_5
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_6
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_Host-species
Host species (Unidentified) for Lysiana exocarpi

Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
Working classification:
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Santalanae
Order: Santalales
Family: Loranthaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – dry, warm conditions growing on host plant

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Mistletoes create rich diversity because of the insects and animals they attract. They are a parasitic (hemi-parasitic) plant that has no roots of its own and grows out of the branches of trees. Their leaves mimic the dominant host plant in their range of distribution – Next time you’re out in the bush and you notice a section of the tree where colour and shape changes, chances are you are looking at a Mistletoe. Australian Mistletoes are renowned mimics and are not related to the “kissing ritual” Northern hemisphere types.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysiana_exocarpi
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Lysiana~exocarpi
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:139130
http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/BT9900475
http://www.cpbr.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-RWP-6743-b.html
https://www.anbg.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-tree-SA.html

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_6
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_5
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_4
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_3
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern (?)
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_2
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_1
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pteridophyta
Class: Polypodiopsida or Pteridopsida (disputed)
Order: Gleicheniales
Family: Gleicheniaceae
Cleland Conservation Park, South Australia – August 2nd, 2014 – in dense mass along creek on the slopes of Mount Lofty – Cool, intermittently wet conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

I was hundreds of yards behind the others in a Eucalypt forest on the slopes of Mount Lofty in a part of the Cleland group of Parks whose specific name escapes me, and I was rushing down a kangaroo track to catch up and suddenly found myself standing in squelchy, peaty wetness – I squealed – My friends assumed it was the cold water seeping into my shoes, but it was because I was surrounded to eye level by a dense mass of the most beautiful species of a fern that was completely new to me – It was all around me and I just stood in the bog, madly snapping away and raving about the species! – It was a moment of pure magic! – Unfortunately as usual, my friends demanded that I hurry up, and so I didn’t get to search for other species in this amazing micro system! I did manage one quick snap of a sad specimen of Blechnum nudum, the Fishbone Water Fern.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleichenia_microphylla
http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/Documents/Gleichenia-microphylla-Notesheet.pdf
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Gleichenia~microphylla
http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=1947

Nephila edulis: 2 – Tiny Satellite Male

South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_male-female_1
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_male-female_2
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_male-female_3
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_male-female_4
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male (just visible) dwarfed by the female

Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver
Male and Female
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Suborder: Araneomorphae
Family: Nephilidae
Dulwich garden – April 24th, 2014 – sunny, pleasant conditions

South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_male-female_1

Photos & Test: Michal Dutkiewicz
Many species of spiders show sexual dimorphism of this degree. The male stays over the other side of the web, and only zips over quickly to mate – He stays nearby though, usually on that other side, near her rear end, often hiding in the clutter of hollowed-out body parts of various parts of insects – I accidentally took some shots featuring the male. I thought I was looking at a blurry shot of the female until I saw the male in the foreground, and I then rushed outside when I noticed I had captured a shot of the male and took more and better shots – Photographing the Nephila was something I would do about once or twice a week – The male and female don’t even look like the same species!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephila_edulis

Nephila edulis: 1 – Female and Nest

South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_1
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_2
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_3
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_4
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
South-Australia-Natureteers-Spider-Araneae-Nephilidae-Nephila-edulis_5
Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest

Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver
Female and nest
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Suborder: Araneomorphae
Family: Nephilidae
Dulwich garden – April 24th, 2014 – sunny, pleasant conditions

Photos & Test: Michal Dutkiewicz

Usually, I would see this female Orb Weaver in the centre of her nest, but was surprised one afternoon to come out and see she wasn’t in that position. After a moment of concerned searching, I saw her on a nearby branch, above and to one side of the web, making final touches to a yellowish, matted nest of spider silk and various forms of organic litter. Since then, the web was interfered with by someone, and she disappeared, but I am hoping some of the young have survived.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephila_edulis

The Snowy Waxcap – Hygrocybe virginea (?)

South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_7
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_2
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_1
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_3
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_4
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_5
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others
South-Australia-Natureteers-Fungi-Agaricales-Waxcap-Hygrophoraceae-Hygrocybe-virginea_6
Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus and many, many others

Hygrocybe virginea (?) aka Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus etcetera, etcetera
Possibly an introduced species (?)
Kingdom: Fungi
Phylum: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Agaricales
Family: Hygrophoraceae
Wittunga Botanic Garden, South Australia – June 29th, 2014 – around the rise on the dam in the grass in cool, damp conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

This species must have a world record in name changes: Snowy Waxcap, Agaricus virgineus, Hygrophorus virgineus, Camarophyllus virgineus, Cuphophyllus virgineus, Agaricus niveus, Hygrophorus niveus, Camarophyllus virginea, Hygrocybe nivea, Cuphophyllus niveus (Really and truly people! – get a Grip!) – An Agaric (gilled mushroom) The species has a largely north temperate distribution, occurring in grassland in Europe and in woodland in North America and northern Asia, but is also known from Australia. It typically produces basidiocarps (fruit bodies) in the autumn.
also been recorded from Australia. Waxcap species grow in old, unimproved, short-sward grassland (pastures and lawns) in Europe, but in woodland elsewhere. Recent research suggests waxcaps are neither mycorrhizal nor saprotrophic but may be associated with mosses. They are good indicators of soil health, because in some areas where there has been farming with chemicals, the Waxcaps won’t return until 50 years after such processes have ceased.
I found the white very tricky to process – Also, Adam and I do what we call undercranking (Darkening the shot in the camera using the A/V Setting so as not to blow the highs) – It really helps in conjunction with selecting a light spot on the subject and half-holding down the click button (Adjust the composition while holding down the half-click to get the framing you want.
Similar species: Humidicutis maevis.
Thanks to Ben Loveday for scouting this bunch for us!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hygrocybe_virginea

Brown Darkling Beetle

South-Australia-Natureteers-Coleoptera-Tenebrionidae-Darkling-Ecnolagria-grandis_1
Ecnolagria grandis aka Brown Darkling Beetle (?)

Ecnolagria grandis aka Brown Darkling Beetle (?)
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Suborder: Polyphaga
Superfamily: Tenebrionoidea
Family: Tenebrionidae
Subfamily: Lagriinae
Tribe: Lagriini
Subtribe: Lagriina
Mylor Conservation Park, South Australia – January 4th, 2014 – warm, sunny conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Amber-coloured Beetles that feed on dead plant and fungal matter and live in a variety of habitats including forests, heaths and urban areas including gardens. The adults can fly but rarely move even when disturbed and then fly slowly. Their two eyes wrap around the base of each antennae. The larva are dark brown and hairy, with a pair of hooks on the rear end and they live in the ground and come out in numbers to feed at the surface by night on vegetable litter including fallen Eucalypt leaves which they leave skeletonized.

http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Ecnolagria+grandis
http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_beetles/BrownDarkling.htm
http://www.zin.ru/animalia/coleoptera/eng/elaec428.htm