Tag Archives: Plants

Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_1
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_2
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_3
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_4
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_5
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_6
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_7
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ericales-Ericaceae-Leucopogon-rufus_8
Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Asteranae
Order: Ericales
Family: Ericaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – mild, overcast conditions

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz

Advertisements

Spyridium vexilliferum – The Winged Spyridium

South-Australia-Natureteers-Rosales-Rhamnaceae-Spyridium-vexilliferum_1
Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
South-Australia-Natureteers-Rosales-Rhamnaceae-Spyridium-vexilliferum_2
Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
South-Australia-Natureteers-Rosales-Rhamnaceae-Spyridium-vexilliferum_3
Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
South-Australia-Natureteers-Rosales-Rhamnaceae-Spyridium-vexilliferum_4
Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium

Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Rosanae
Order: Rosales
Family: Rhamnaceae
Black Hill Conservation Park, South Australia – January 24th, 2015 – flowering has occurred after heavy rain a couple of weeks before

Photos & Text: John Fleming

These Spyridium vexilliferum photos were taken of a single plant in Black Hill Conservation Park 24 January 2015.
The flowering has occurred after heavy rain a couple of weeks before. The E-flora of SA describes the flowering time as “throughout the year”, so opportunistic flowering appears likely.
The plant was growing in the shelter of eucalypts, sheoaks and Acacia, and although it had a north facing aspect was in a sheltered valley, about 350m above sea level.
According to the plant list compiled by R.Taplin of Black Hill Conservation Park in 19 September 1995, the subsecies is Spyridium vexilliferum var. vexilliferum , known as the winged spyridium.
The range of this sub- species is from lower Eyre peninsula through to Tasmania.
http://www.oznativeplants.com/plantdetail/Winged-Spyridium/Spyridium/vexilliferum/zz.html
http://www.flora.sa.gov.au/cgi-bin/speciesfacts_display.cgi?genus=Spyridium&species=vexilliferum&iname=vexilliferum
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Spyridium+vexilliferum+var.+vexilliferum
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:546150
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyridium_vexilliferum

Harlequin Mistletoe – Lysiana exocarpi – A Pretty And Tasty Mimic

South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_1
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_2
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_3
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_4
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_5
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_6
Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
South-Australia-Natureteers-Santalales-Loranthaceae-Lysiana-exocarpi_Host-species
Host species (Unidentified) for Lysiana exocarpi

Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
Working classification:
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Santalanae
Order: Santalales
Family: Loranthaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – dry, warm conditions growing on host plant

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Mistletoes create rich diversity because of the insects and animals they attract. They are a parasitic (hemi-parasitic) plant that has no roots of its own and grows out of the branches of trees. Their leaves mimic the dominant host plant in their range of distribution – Next time you’re out in the bush and you notice a section of the tree where colour and shape changes, chances are you are looking at a Mistletoe. Australian Mistletoes are renowned mimics and are not related to the “kissing ritual” Northern hemisphere types.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysiana_exocarpi
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Lysiana~exocarpi
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:139130
http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/BT9900475
http://www.cpbr.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-RWP-6743-b.html
https://www.anbg.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-tree-SA.html

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_6
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_5
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_4
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_3
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern (?)
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_2
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
South-Australia-Natureteers-Ferns-Gleicheniales-Gleicheniaceae-Gleichenia-microphylla_1
Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pteridophyta
Class: Polypodiopsida or Pteridopsida (disputed)
Order: Gleicheniales
Family: Gleicheniaceae
Cleland Conservation Park, South Australia – August 2nd, 2014 – in dense mass along creek on the slopes of Mount Lofty – Cool, intermittently wet conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

I was hundreds of yards behind the others in a Eucalypt forest on the slopes of Mount Lofty in a part of the Cleland group of Parks whose specific name escapes me, and I was rushing down a kangaroo track to catch up and suddenly found myself standing in squelchy, peaty wetness – I squealed – My friends assumed it was the cold water seeping into my shoes, but it was because I was surrounded to eye level by a dense mass of the most beautiful species of a fern that was completely new to me – It was all around me and I just stood in the bog, madly snapping away and raving about the species! – It was a moment of pure magic! – Unfortunately as usual, my friends demanded that I hurry up, and so I didn’t get to search for other species in this amazing micro system! I did manage one quick snap of a sad specimen of Blechnum nudum, the Fishbone Water Fern.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleichenia_microphylla
http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/Documents/Gleichenia-microphylla-Notesheet.pdf
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Gleichenia~microphylla
http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=1947

The Leafy Sun Orchid – Thelymitra bracteata

South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Sun-Orchid-Thelymitra-bracteata_1
Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Sun-Orchid-Thelymitra-bracteata_2
Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Sun-Orchid-Thelymitra-bracteata_3
Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Sun-Orchid-Thelymitra-bracteata_4
Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Sun-Orchid-Thelymitra-bracteata_5
Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid

Thelymitra bracteata aka Large Bracted Sun Orchid, Leafy Sun-orchid
Working classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Lilianae
Order: Asparagales
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Orchidoidae
Tribe: Diurideae
Subtribe: Thelymitrinae
Lobethal roadside scrub verge – October 25th, 2014 – warm, dry conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

These were growing next to a roadside metal rail in, what at first sight, seemed to be very unpromising conditions. We had stopped the car to take photographs of an old brickworks that was just 50 yards or so down the scrub-covered hill from the road – I was stunned to see these amazing Orchids in quite a dense group. I didn’t know what species this was, because the blue Thelymitras confuse me, but Sheridan Ford said, on the Australian Native Orchids Facebook Page: “My guess is T. bracteata. I don’t think it is pauciflora as pauci only has 1-5 flowers. The giveaway for me is the large, prominent bracts, sharply bent column arms with toothbrush-like hair tufts and the robust habit of the plant.” Thanks Sheridan. Here are my other articles on Thelymitra plus some outside links you may find useful:
https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/the-great-sun-orchid-thelymitra-grandiflora/
https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/11/29/spotted-sun-orchid-have-a-lush-colour-palette/
https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/11/28/the-salmon-thelymitra/
https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/11/27/rabbit-ears-sun-orchids-in-profusion-at-cromer-conservation-park/

http://www.retiredaussies.com/ColinsHome%20Page/Orchidssa/Thelymitra/Thelymitra%20bracteata%20SA/Thelymitra%20bracteata%20SA09.htm
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Thelymitra+bracteata

Caladenia leptochila aka Arachnorchis leptochila – The Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid

South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Spider-Orchid-Arachnorchis-Caladenia-leptochila_1
Caladenia (Arachnorchis) leptochila aka Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid, Delicate-lipped Caladenia
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Spider-Orchid-Arachnorchis-Caladenia-leptochila_2
Caladenia (Arachnorchis) leptochila aka Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid, Delicate-lipped Caladenia
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Spider-Orchid-Arachnorchis-Caladenia-leptochila_3
Caladenia (Arachnorchis) leptochila aka Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid, Delicate-lipped Caladenia
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Orchidaceae-Spider-Orchid-Arachnorchis-Caladenia-leptochila_4
Caladenia (Arachnorchis) leptochila aka Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid, Delicate-lipped Caladenia

Caladenia (Arachnorchis) leptochila aka Narrow-lipped Spider-orchid, Delicate-lipped Caladenia
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Angiospermae
Class: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Orchidaceae
Subfamily: Orchidoideae
Tribe: Diurideae
Subtribe: Caladeniinae
Morialta Conservation Park – September 2013 – mild, wet conditions on Central Track

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

There is a lot of confusion with plant taxonomy at the moment, and this is one of the victims – Some call it Caladenia leptochila, and others use the name Arachnorchis leptochila ssp leptochila. It often grows nearby to other species such as Caladenia tentaculata, but it is much more slender and the scented tentacled petals, or segments,  curve more vertically upwards. It has a hairy stem and is 15-45cm high.
Its flowers can be seen usually on solitary spikes in Spring, from September to November in the Mount Lofty Ranges. According to NOSSA, it prefers “leached, stony soils”. I first encountered it in close proximity to Caladenia tentaculata and at first thought it must be an emerging flower of that species, but after walking around the gravelly, gentle slope, I saw there were clearly two species – I was so stunned by these two species and the others I saw that day! One of the greatest days of my life and my brother and I still refer to that day as Orchid Day! See my other posts on Spider-orchid species here:

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/caladenia-tentaculata-a-sophisticated-mimic/

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/veined-caladenia/

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/11/26/little-desert-spider-orchid/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caladenia

http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Narrow-lip+Spider+Orchid
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Arachnorchis+leptochila
http://www.johnwamsley.com/november28.html

http://nossa.org.au/tag/arachnorchis-leptochila/

The Nodding Chocolate Lily – Arthropodium fimbriatum

South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_1
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_2
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_3
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_4
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_5
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
South-Australia-Natureteers-Asparagales-Asparagaceae-Dichopogon-Arthropodium-fimbriatum_6
Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily

Arthropodium fimbriatum aka Dichopogon fimbriatus, Nodding Chocolate Lily
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Angiosperms
Class: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Asparagaceae
Subfamily: Lomandroideae
Morialta Conservation Park, South Australia (Central Track, near Moores Rd entrance) – January 10th, 2015 – cool, wet conditions after 2 days of rain

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

I haven’t seen an Arthropodium with this colour or quite this shape before – I really don’t know why this looks like this. I have noticed the way the flowers connect to the stems is a little different, thinner and more feeble than Arthropodium strictum, and also the arrangement along the stem, and possibly small differences in the sex parts, plus the edges of the petals almost look serrated, whereas A. strictum looks more fluted and undulating – The colours on the stamens are different in my specimens, but many specimens are more purple on the anther part of the stamens and the greenish filament part which connects to the flower is cream yellow on mine – This is not, therefore, a universal example of the appearance of this flower and I have insufficient knowledge to know why these I have photographed differ. See also my entry on Arthropodium strictum aka Dichopogon strictus.

https://sanatureteers.wordpress.com/2014/11/28/chocolate-lily/

http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Dichopogon~fimbriatus
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:302905