Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
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Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath

Leucopogon rufus aka Ruddy Bearded-heath
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Asteranae
Order: Ericales
Family: Ericaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – mild, overcast conditions

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz

Spyridium vexilliferum – The Winged Spyridium

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Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
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Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
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Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
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Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium

Spyridium vexilliferum ssp vexilliferum aka Winged Spyridium
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Rosanae
Order: Rosales
Family: Rhamnaceae
Black Hill Conservation Park, South Australia – January 24th, 2015 – flowering has occurred after heavy rain a couple of weeks before

Photos & Text: John Fleming

These Spyridium vexilliferum photos were taken of a single plant in Black Hill Conservation Park 24 January 2015.
The flowering has occurred after heavy rain a couple of weeks before. The E-flora of SA describes the flowering time as “throughout the year”, so opportunistic flowering appears likely.
The plant was growing in the shelter of eucalypts, sheoaks and Acacia, and although it had a north facing aspect was in a sheltered valley, about 350m above sea level.
According to the plant list compiled by R.Taplin of Black Hill Conservation Park in 19 September 1995, the subsecies is Spyridium vexilliferum var. vexilliferum , known as the winged spyridium.
The range of this sub- species is from lower Eyre peninsula through to Tasmania.
http://www.oznativeplants.com/plantdetail/Winged-Spyridium/Spyridium/vexilliferum/zz.html
http://www.flora.sa.gov.au/cgi-bin/speciesfacts_display.cgi?genus=Spyridium&species=vexilliferum&iname=vexilliferum
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/Spyridium+vexilliferum+var.+vexilliferum
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:546150
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spyridium_vexilliferum

Harlequin Mistletoe – Lysiana exocarpi – A Pretty And Tasty Mimic

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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
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Host species (Unidentified) for Lysiana exocarpi

Lysiana exocarpi aka Harlequin Mistletoe
Working classification:
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Charophyta
Class: Equisetopsida
Subclass: Magnoliidae
Superorder: Santalanae
Order: Santalales
Family: Loranthaceae
Aldinga Scrub, South Australia – January 31st, 2015 – dry, warm conditions growing on host plant

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

Mistletoes create rich diversity because of the insects and animals they attract. They are a parasitic (hemi-parasitic) plant that has no roots of its own and grows out of the branches of trees. Their leaves mimic the dominant host plant in their range of distribution – Next time you’re out in the bush and you notice a section of the tree where colour and shape changes, chances are you are looking at a Mistletoe. Australian Mistletoes are renowned mimics and are not related to the “kissing ritual” Northern hemisphere types.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lysiana_exocarpi
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Lysiana~exocarpi
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:apni.taxon:139130
http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/BT9900475
http://www.cpbr.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-RWP-6743-b.html
https://www.anbg.gov.au/mistletoe/images/caption-image/lysiana-exocarpi-exocarpi-tree-SA.html

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern (?)
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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
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Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern

Gleichenia microphylla aka Scrambling Coral Fern
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Pteridophyta
Class: Polypodiopsida or Pteridopsida (disputed)
Order: Gleicheniales
Family: Gleicheniaceae
Cleland Conservation Park, South Australia – August 2nd, 2014 – in dense mass along creek on the slopes of Mount Lofty – Cool, intermittently wet conditions

Photos & Text: Michal Dutkiewicz

I was hundreds of yards behind the others in a Eucalypt forest on the slopes of Mount Lofty in a part of the Cleland group of Parks whose specific name escapes me, and I was rushing down a kangaroo track to catch up and suddenly found myself standing in squelchy, peaty wetness – I squealed – My friends assumed it was the cold water seeping into my shoes, but it was because I was surrounded to eye level by a dense mass of the most beautiful species of a fern that was completely new to me – It was all around me and I just stood in the bog, madly snapping away and raving about the species! – It was a moment of pure magic! – Unfortunately as usual, my friends demanded that I hurry up, and so I didn’t get to search for other species in this amazing micro system! I did manage one quick snap of a sad specimen of Blechnum nudum, the Fishbone Water Fern.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleichenia_microphylla
http://dpipwe.tas.gov.au/Documents/Gleichenia-microphylla-Notesheet.pdf
http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Gleichenia~microphylla
http://www.nzpcn.org.nz/flora_details.aspx?ID=1947

Dunn’s Peacock Spider – Maratus pavonis: 1 – A Little Male a-Roving!

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Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider, (Male)
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Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider, (Male)
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Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider, (Male)
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Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider, (Male)
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Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider, (Male)

Maratus pavonis aka Dunn’s Peacock Spider
Male
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Family: Salticidae
Subfamily: Euophryinae
Mount Barker, South Australia – Longleat Property – October 17th, 2014 – on a warm, sunny day in the flower garden

Photos: Michal Dutkiewicz
Text: Michal Dutkiewicz & extra additions by Karin Dawson

When Karin Dawson invited me up to photograph Feather-legged Assassin Bugs (As featured on a David Attenborough documentary) and this Peacock Spider, I still couldn’t believe that we had one of these colourful Spiders here in South Australia! – There are a number of species of the Peacock Jumpies in Australia. They are members of the Jumping Spider family Salticidae, and this is, as far as Karin and I can ascertain, the only species that occurs here in South Australia.

Only the males are brightly-coloured. The species occurs from South Australia around the southern east coast of Australia, including Tasmania, and there is a slightly brighter variant with a slightly different abdomen from Western Australia that Jumpies fans from those parts might want to keep a look out for. I wish we could have gotten closer shots, but he was moving very quickly …

Karin observed the female to be about 8 mm long, and the male was only 4 mm long; a big discrepancy in size, but certainly not unusual in the the spider world.

http://www.arachne.org.au/01_cms/details.asp?ID=2446
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maratus

Nephila edulis: 2 – Tiny Satellite Male

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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male dwarfed by the female
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, male (just visible) dwarfed by the female

Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver
Male and Female
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Suborder: Araneomorphae
Family: Nephilidae
Dulwich garden – April 24th, 2014 – sunny, pleasant conditions

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Photos & Test: Michal Dutkiewicz
Many species of spiders show sexual dimorphism of this degree. The male stays over the other side of the web, and only zips over quickly to mate – He stays nearby though, usually on that other side, near her rear end, often hiding in the clutter of hollowed-out body parts of various parts of insects – I accidentally took some shots featuring the male. I thought I was looking at a blurry shot of the female until I saw the male in the foreground, and I then rushed outside when I noticed I had captured a shot of the male and took more and better shots – Photographing the Nephila was something I would do about once or twice a week – The male and female don’t even look like the same species!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephila_edulis

Nephila edulis: 1 – Female and Nest

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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest
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Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver, tending her nest

Nephila edulis aka Golden Silk Orb Weaver
Female and nest
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Suborder: Araneomorphae
Family: Nephilidae
Dulwich garden – April 24th, 2014 – sunny, pleasant conditions

Photos & Test: Michal Dutkiewicz

Usually, I would see this female Orb Weaver in the centre of her nest, but was surprised one afternoon to come out and see she wasn’t in that position. After a moment of concerned searching, I saw her on a nearby branch, above and to one side of the web, making final touches to a yellowish, matted nest of spider silk and various forms of organic litter. Since then, the web was interfered with by someone, and she disappeared, but I am hoping some of the young have survived.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nephila_edulis